Troy

Troy1


The whole area abounds in places of natural beauty as well as spots of historical interest. There is a crater lake in Merdivenli village, and ancient caverns in Demirtaş and Delitaş villages, as well as pine forests extending towards the Madra Stream. The area is also famous for its thermal springs, which are in Nebiler, Bademli and Kocaoba villages. Furthermore, the beaches in Bademli and Denizköy are important tourist attractions within the region. Dikili has a fine port large enough to accommodate three passenger ships simultaneously, and the port has good land transport connections. nach oben  



Troy2

A new city called Ilium was founded on the site in the reign of the Roman Emperor Augustus. It flourished until the establishment of Constantinople and declined gradually during the Byzantine era. In 1865, English archaeologist Frank Calvert excavated trial trenches in a field he had bought from a local farmer at Hisarlık, and in 1868 Heinrich Schliemann, wealthy German businessman and archaeologist, also began excavating in the area after a chance meeting with Calvert in çanakkale.[4][5] These excavations revealed several cities built in succession. Troy VII has been identified with the Hittite Wilusa, the probable origin of the Greek Ἴλιον, and is generally (but not conclusively) identified with Homeric Troy. Today, Truva is a small Turkish city supporting the tourist trade visiting the Troia archaeological site. Troia was added to the UNESCO World Heritage list in 1998. The national Historic Park of Troy is 185 km away from Ernis House. Source & more details on : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/troynach oben